Weiss, Alden & Polo, P.A. - Miami and Boca Raton Immigration Attorneys Weiss, Alden & Polo, P.A. - Miami and Boca Raton Immigration Attorneys
Call us with questions
305-358-1500 Miami-Dade
561-393-7400 Palm Beach County
954-406-1833 Broward
888-810-6621 Toll Free

May 2015 Archives

Some legislators seek to change birthright citizenship in U.S.

Readers may be aware that in most cases babies who are born in the United States are considered citizens of this nation. This is true even if their parents are not U.S. citizens. The birth of a baby in the U.S. to noncitizen parents sometimes creates a situation with which the nation has a hard time reconciling. Should the parents of children who are here without documentation be sent home? If so, do the kids—who are citizens of the U.S.—go with them?

Families in limbo waiting for immigration matters to be resolved

In previous posts we have written about the frustrations various types of businesses are experiencing while waiting for immigration matters to be worked through. While these entities are undoubtedly facing hurdles in that department, they are not the only ones. Families are having to navigate the immigration system without knowing how things will end up as well.

Immigration court backlog at all-time-high

Immigrants throughout the nation who are facing deportation can expect to go through an immigration court. During the period of time between receiving a notice and the court date occurring, those who are facing the hearing can feel as though their lives are limbo. Accordingly, in many instances those who find themselves in this position would prefer that their day in an immigration court happen in a timely manner. As those who are currently in this position are likely well aware, the waiting period is anything but timely.

Commentary: Speak Out Against Notario Fraud and Immigration Scams

Notario fraud is rampant across the United States, but especially in Latino, Caribbean, Russian and Brazilian communities in South Florida. Scammers target their own, preying on fearful, desperate immigrants and promising often unattainable results. This is something that will increase as immigrants anxiously wait for President Barack Obama's executive orders on immigration reform to come into effect.

Chinese EB-5 investors may need to wait a bit longer for visa

One of the ways that someone might move to the United States for business is via an EB-5 visa. To utilize this type of visa a person must invest a minimum of $500,000 in a region of the U.S. that is economically challenged. Those who qualify are allowed to bring their immediate families with them and all will receive conditional green cards. Those conditional green cards are good for two years after which the conditions may be removed. 

Could those protected by DACA serve in the U.S. military?

As we have mentioned previously, immigration laws can change quickly. Currently lawmakers in our nation’s capital are debating the role individuals who have received protection under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals will play in protecting the United States. Specifically a proposed amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act would make it possible for individuals who are part of DACA to serve in the armed forces.  They would be eligible to serve if the defense secretary deemed it to be “vital to the national interest.”

Professional baseball player becomes U.S. citizen

In our last two posts we have focused on the requirements of United States citizenship as well as what to expect of the citizenship test. In this post we will focus on one resident of Florida who recently made it through the process. Baseball player Jose Fernandez recently became a U.S. citizen.