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July 2014 Archives

Agricultural groups seek reform of temporary guest worker program

For much of the nation conversations regarding immigration focus on the treatment of children who have entered the country unaccompanied and without proper documentation. For others, such as members of Florida’s agricultural industry however, the conversation is a little closer to home. Their concerns revolve around adequate staffing of the fields and orchards that supply the nation with produce. These employers rely upon seasonal labor provided by individuals from other countries who are in the United States on an H-2A visa which is available under the temporary guest work program.

Florida county stops automatic compliance to detainer requests

For individuals throughout the state of Florida who are in the country without proper documentation being detained by law enforcement officers is one of their greatest fears. In some Florida counties, once in custody, individuals may be subject to federal “detainer requests.” When granted, these requests keep an individual in jail for up to 2 days during which time they can be taken into custody by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Once in ICE’s custody they may be deported.

Will immigrant driver's licenses be next in Florida?

Despite the inability for lawmakers at the federal level to make progress in immigration reform, other states, including Florida are working through their own issues. A good example of this is the recent passage of the law making it possible for those who do not have proper documentation, to pay in-state tuition for college. Perhaps buoyed by the success of that law, a Florida immigration group is attempting to make another change.

Lawsuit seeks legal counsel for children in immigration hearings

Many individuals reading this blog are likely aware of the large influx of children who have entered the United States without proper documentation. While there are likely many reasons these young people are making their way to the U.S. without the accompaniment of an adult, it is fair to say that all are probably seeking a better life than what is available to them in their home countries. After crossing the border, many young people are taken into custody by the U.S. government with the intent that they will be deported. 

Tuition sends college age students back to England for school

With the recent passage of the law in Florida that makes certain individuals who live in the state without proper documentation eligible for in-state tuition, many are likely poised to attend college in the fall. Meanwhile, there are other individuals who despite entering the country with a visa, must still pay out-of-state tuition. Two siblings who were born in England are facing that reality now.

Abused, neglected or abandoned immigrant children may stay in US

In previous posts we have mentioned the complexity of immigration laws.  While the more common paths to residency and even citizenship, may be well known, there may be other routes that could bring or keep someone in the United States that they are not aware of. One such law may pertain to some of the estimated 60,000 children who have been crossing into the U.S. over the last year or so, without their parents.