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August 2013 Archives

Priority dates for EB-3 visas moved up

Earlier this month we wrote about changes to the priority date for green card holders seeking F-2A visas. The priority date for those visas is current through this month as well as September. Recent United States Department of State Visa Bulletins have provided information that could be of interest to those in the Miami, Florida areas regarding other visa priority dates as well. One particular visa is the employment-based third preference, or EB-3, visa.

Deferred action program 1 year old

Last summer President Obama announced a program designed to provide certain undocumented immigrants, in South Florida and beyond, with a two year reprieve from deportation. To qualify for the program, referred to as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, an individual must meet several requirements. It has been a year since the first applications were received by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. In this post we will take a look at where the program stands based on information recently released by the Brookings Institute.

Priority date current for green card holders seeking F-2A visas

As individuals in the Miami area who have applied for certain visas are likely aware, the wait can be a long one. Depending on one’s situation, in some cases individuals have been waiting for decades. Because of this, information found in the United States Department of State Visa Bulletin for August 2013, is of great interest to at least some of the people awaiting permission to enter the U.S. The bulletin indicates that petitioners in possession of green cards who are seeking visas for children or spouses should take action immediately. This is because the priority date for individuals seeking these F-2A visas is current.

Undocumented immigrant secures software engineer position

As we have discussed in previous posts, some of the biggest proponents of immigration reform are businesses seeking skilled workers. The shortage of workers in the United States who are qualified to perform technical jobs in particular, has led businesses of all sizes to try to secure workers skilled in this area from other countries. A woman seeking to hire an undocumented immigrant as a software engineer for a startup experienced the process of trying to secure a change in status, firsthand.

Undocumented immigrant's quest for Florida law license continues

Last year we wrote a post about a man living in Florida who after completing law school, took, and passed the Florida bar exam. Despite his passing score, he has thus far not been sworn in as a lawyer. The reason for this is his immigration status. The man is an undocumented immigrant who was brought to the United States a child. In this post we provide an update on the matter.

Changes made to handling of same-sex spouse visa applications

Earlier this summer we wrote about the impact the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on the Defense of Marriage Act was poised to have on the immigration system. In this post we provide an update on the topic that could be relevant to individuals in South Florida. Last month, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services indicated that visa applications submitted by same-sex spouses would be treated in the same manner as all others. More recently those changes were extended to U.S. embassies and consulates as well.

Anticipating changes to family visas many take action

As immigration reform is hashed out in the nation’s capital, some individuals interested in immigrating to locations such as Miami are working to proactively protect themselves from changes that could potentially make it more difficult to obtain a green card. One of those changes is the elimination of preferences when a family member seeks to get a green card. While certain groups of immigrants, such as those originally from countries in Asia, rely more heavily upon family visas to get to the U.S., currently, they are open to everyone.