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September 2012 Archives

Appeals court rules on green card application dates

For many people living in Miami, seeking to obtain legal residency in the United States, the chosen path is via a green card. Unfortunately, as we have discussed in previous posts, the length of time it takes to secure a green card is quite long. This means that in some situations where young people have sought to immigrate under green card applications submitted by their parents, upon turning 21, the children lost their priority date. Those individuals then needed to reapply for green cards independently which effectively sent them to the back of the line.

Delayed deportation approved for 29 immigrants

Under the Obama administration, at least some undocumented immigrants have been granted leniency from deportation. Most recently, 29 applicants for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program have been approved. These 29 individuals are now eligible to receive work permits and will be allowed to stay in the U.S. for the next two years.

Should parents of U.S. citizens be exempt from deportation?

Under the current administration, immigration agencies have been ordered to focus on deporting undocumented immigrants in Florida who pose a threat to public safety, such as those people with criminal convictions. On the other hand, young people whose parents brought them to the U.S. when they were younger than 16 are now allowed to apply for work permits and have been granted temporary exemption from deportation .

Immigration status of parents not relevant in Florida tuition rates

This past February we wrote a post on Florida's SB 106. The bill was an effort to allow citizens who were born in the United States but whose parents are undocumented immigrants to be eligible for in-state college tuition. The bill was ultimately not passed and these individuals were forced to pay out-of-state tuition to attend Florida post secondary institutions, despite, in many cases, having been born and lived in the state of Florida their entire lives.